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BTR-60 - Бронетранспортер (СССР), продолжение

BTR-60 - ...ПРОДОЛЖЕНИЕ

Foreign service
BTR-60 APCs were employed widely both by the Soviet Army and by more than 30 export customers. Operators of the BTR-60 have included Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bhutan, Botswana, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Congo, Cuba, Djibouti, East Germany, Ethiopia, Finland, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, India, Iran, Iraq, Laos, Libya, Mali, Mongolia, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Nicaragua, North Korea, Romania, Soviet Union, Syria, Uganda, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Yemen, and Zambia, as well as many of the successor states of the Soviet Union. The most widely spread model is the BTR-60PB.
Although the BTR-60 still remains in service with many of the world's armies, it is almost never used as an APC any more. They are still being used as mobile command posts, artillery forward observation posts, airplane guidance posts, communication posts and many other specialized roles.
The BTR-60 has seen action in the Yom Kippur War, the 1971 War between India and Pakistan (where it was used very effectively to punch a hole through to Jessore and subsequently Khulna), the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan (where it was used by both the Soviet and Afghan government troops), the Chechen and Yugoslav wars. It was also used by Warsaw Pact forces during the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia.
Angola
The Soviet Union invested heavily in bolstering the mechanized and armoured capabilities of the People's Armed Forces of Liberation of Angola (FAPLA) during the Angolan Civil War. To that end, it provided FAPLA with just under 500 BTR-60s as part of a comprehensive military assistance programme between 1975 and 1989. FAPLA initially received 74 BTR-60PBs in 1975, and ordered another 175 BTR-60PBs in 1980, which were delivered between 1981 and 1985. In 1987 and 1988, Angolan motorized brigades received another 250 BTR-60PBs and some BTR-60R-145BM command vehicles.
For most of the 1970s, FAPLA remained critically short of modern armoured vehicles, and as late as 1981 many of its motorized infantry formations were equipped only with trucks or obsolete BTR-152s. By the late 1980s, however, the BTR-60 had largely superseded the BTR-152 in FAPLA service and was being deployed frequently during the civil war. FAPLA's motorized brigades, which bore the brunt of South African counter-insurgency as well as conventional army operations, came to include three companies of BTR-60s each. Additionally, both the Cuban and Soviet military missions in Angola possessed a number of BTR-60s, which were used for general liaison purposes.
A number of FAPLA BTR-60PBs were deployed during the Battle of Cuito Cuanavale, with 65 being lost during several engagements with South African expeditionary forces. FAPLA was not successful in coordinating its combined arms operations over the course of the campaign, and on several occasions the Angolan motorized infantry became separated from their accompanying armour or advanced with no accompanying armour at all, allowing the much more lightly armed South African troops to isolate and destroy them. The first armour-to-armour kill of the battle occurred on 9 September 1987, when a lone BTR-60 carrying out reconnaissance on the Lomba River was knocked out by a South African Ratel infantry fighting vehicle.
Over the course of the civil war, FAPLA BTR-60PBs were commonly used for convoy escort purposes, guarding logistical vehicles bringing fresh supplies and ammunition to the front lines. In this role they were used to repel counter-insurgent ambushes, with some success. Due to prevalence of land mines on Angolan roads, the BTRs always traveled behind a bulldozer or a tank equipped for mine clearance. During the late 1980s, the threat of ambush by South African troops with armoured vehicles and heavy weapons of their own prompted the BTR-60 to be complemented in this role by the much more heavily armed BMP-1.
Finland
Finland's Jäger battalions operated Soviet-built BTR-60R-145BM "Chaika" vehicles. These were upgraded to BTR-60PUM standard between 1996 and 1997. In 1991, seven conscripts of the Karelia Brigade drowned when their BTR-60 sank at Taipalsaari during an amphibious exercise because the vehicle was loaded incorrectly (top-heavy) and the roof hatches opened.
The usual nicknames for BTR-60 amongst the Finnish conscripts were Petteri (a male name), after the initials BTR, and Taipalsaaren sukellusvene (Taipalsaari Submarine) after the 1991 incident.
Poland
Milicja Obywatelska (MO) operated several BTR-60PAs. They were used by ZOMO riot control units. The Polish Army also received a dozen BTR-60PU-12s, which were used within the Soviet supplied 9K33 Osa SAM regiment delivered between 1980 and 1985. On 7 December 1981, the delegation of the Polish Ministry of Internal Affairs went to the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs asking for equipment and supplies necessary to equip around 60,000 MO operatives and reservists enlisted because of the intensified activities against the Communist government. In response, on 17 December, the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs decided to transfer 25 BTR-60PBs along with 10,250,000 "Czeromucha" incapacitating chemical devices and 2,000 tonnes of gas over to its Polish counterpart. These vehicles had previously been used in Afghanistan. They were later modified by adding another radio set. They were used by ZOMO. During the martial law in Poland, the MSW automobile plant in Łódź fitted some BTRs with breakers mounted on the front of the vehicle, which were used for clearing obstacles (See Poland section in the Variants section for details). When the Milicja Obywatelska was transformed back into Policja in 1990, all BTR-60PBs had their armament removed. This was because Policja, unlike MO, didn't have a need for weaponry with such a high muzzle velocity - such weapons were dangerous to use in urban areas. The MO needed such weaponry because it was also supposed to carry out anti-partisan operations. Policja used unarmed BTR-60PBs for security during European Economy Summit 2004 in Warsaw, as well as for clearing blockades set up by the Samoobrona political party. A few Police BTR-60PBs are kept in storage for anti-riot duty as barricade breakers.
People's Republic of China
PRC reversed engineered the BTR-60PB after capturing four examples during the Sino-Soviet border conflict on Zhenbao Island in March 1969. The program was completed in the late 1970s. However, the vehicle did not enter service in large numbers because the PRC's primitive road system and rugged terrain meant that the wheeled APC was not well suited for the Chinese conditions as it lacked the cross country capability of the tracked APCs in the Chinese inventory. It should be noted though that, before the Sino-Soviet split, the PRC imported 100 BTR-40s and 100 BTR-152s from the USSR and manufactured copies of those vehicles; and these served with the PLA until the mid-1990s. The experience gained through reverse-engineering the BTR-60 helped the PRC in developing other more advanced wheeled APCs later in the 1980s.
List of conflicts
1965-1973 - Vietnam War (North Vietnam)
1966-1991 - South African Border War (Angola, Cuba)
1967 - Six-Day War (Egypt, Syria)
1968 - Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia
1969 - Sino-Soviet border conflict (Soviet Union)
1973 - Yom Kippur War (Egypt, Syria)
1974-1991 - Ethiopian Civil War
1961-1991 - Eritrean War for Independence
1975-1990 - Lebanese Civil War
1975-1991 - Western Sahara War (Polisario)
1975-2002 - Angolan Civil War
1977-1978 - Ogaden War
1978-1987 - Chadian-Libyan conflict
1979-1988 - Soviet-Afghan War (Soviet Union, Afghanistan)
1980-1988 - Iran-Iraq War (Iran, Iraq)
1982 - 1982 Ethiopian-Somali Border War
1983 - Invasion of Grenada (Grenada)
1988-1993 - Georgian Civil War
1992-1993 - War in Abkhazia
1988-1994 - First Nagorno-Karabakh War (Nagorno-Karabakh, Armenia, Azerbaijan)
1989 - Romanian Revolution (Romania)
1990-1991 - First Persian Gulf War (Iraq)
1991-present - Somali Civil War
1991-1999 - Yugoslav wars
1992-1997 - Civil War in Tajikistan
1993 - present - Kurdish-Turkish conflict (Turkey)
1994 - Civil War in Yemen
1994-1996 - First Chechen War (Russia)
1999-2009 - Second Chechen War (Russia)
2001-2016 - War in Afghanistan
2003-2011 - Iraq War
2003 - Invasion of Iraq (Iraq)
2011 - Libyan Civil War (Gaddafi and Anti-Gaddafi forces)
2011-present - Syrian civil war (Government forces and rebels)
2014-present - Russo-Ukrainian War
2020 - 2020 Nagorno-Karabakh conflict

Variants

Former Soviet Union
BTR-60P (1959) (P stands for plavajushhijj - "swimming") - Initial version with troop compartment completely exposed and often covered with bows and canvas. The vehicle has mounting points for three 7.62 mm machine guns (either the PKT, the SGMB or the PKB tank/medium/general-purpose machine guns), one on the front and one on each side between the two small doors; however, only one mount is fitted, and that is usually on the front mounting point. The vehicle carries 2,000 machine gun rounds. It was also known under the designation GAZ-49.
BTR-60P with a modified machine gun mounting point in the front to fit the DShK 1938/46 12.7 mm heavy machine gun like in BTR-60PA instead of the 7.62 mm machine gun. The vehicle carries 500 rounds for the DShK 1938/46 12.7 mm heavy machine gun and 3,000 rounds for 7.62 mm machine guns.
BTR-60P converted into a command vehicle equipped with a rail-type antennae running around three sides of the hull top.
BTR-60P M1961/1 - BTR-60P converted into a fire support vehicle. It is fitted with the turret from the PT-76 amphibious light tank. Most probably prototype only.
BTR-60P M1961/1 fitted with a smaller version of the PT-76 turret. Most probably prototype only.
BTR-60P M1961/2 - BTR-60P converted into a fire support vehicle. It is fitted with a small open-topped turret armed with a 37 mm gun with clean barrel with conical flash-hider. Most probably prototype only.
BTR-60P converted into a mortar carrier. It can carry up to two mortars, along with their crews and ammunition.
MTR-2 - BTR-60P converted into a repair vehicle with a raised tarpaulin cover over the troop compartment running almost to the rear.
BTR-60PA (1963) - This version has an armoured roof over the troop compartment. It is fitted with improved 'closed-down' vision devices for the crew. Behind the commander's and driver's hatches is a single rear-opening rectangular hatch in front of which is a single mount for the DShK 1938/46 12.7 mm heavy machine gun between the two circular crew hatches at the front of the personnel compartment and two optional mounts for 7.62 mm machine guns (either the PKT, the SGMB or the PKB tank/medium/general-purpose machine guns) on each side of the roof of the personnel compartment. Early production BTR-60PAs only had a single mount for the 7.62 mm machine gun between the two circular crew hatches at the front of the personnel compartment. The small doors on each side of the hull that were present in the BTR-60P were removed. The BTR-60PA introduced collective NBC protection system to the series. It has six handrails on the each side, in rows of three. The personnel compartment has two rectangular hatches. The fact that the roof has been added makes passengers more vulnerable to enemy fire while they're exiting the vehicle through the top hatches. Also, the gunner must be at least shoulder high out of the vehicle to operate the weapons. The vehicle carries 500 rounds for the DShK 1938/46 12.7 mm heavy machine gun and 3,000 rounds for 7.62 mm machine guns. The weight of the vehicle increased from 9.8 tonnes to 10.2 tonnes. It was also known under the designation BTR-60PK, where K stands for krisha - "roof" and GAZ-49A.
BTR-60PA-1 (1965) - Upgraded BTR-60PA with improved power plant and transmission and the R-123 radio instead of the R-113. The weight of the vehicle increased from 10.2 tonnes to 10.3 tonnes. It entered service in very small numbers.
BTR-60PA converted into a command vehicle equipped with two side-mounted angled telescopic masts.
MTP-2 (MTP stands for mashina tekhnicheskoj pomoshchi) - BTR-60PA converted into a technical support vehicle based on the BTR-60PA. It is equipped with a crane mounted on the front of the hull. While in transport, the crane is carried on the left-hand side of the vehicle. It's also fitted with several stowage boxes, two on the roof behind the front hatches, one smaller on the front of the right-hand side of the hull and two over the engine decks. It is also missing two or three hand rails.
BTR-60PAI (1965) - Initial version with the DShK 1938/46 12.7 mm heavy machine gun replaced by the conical BPU-1 turret from the BRDM-2, which is armed with the KPVT 14.5 mm heavy machine gun and the PKT 7.62 mm coaxial tank machine gun, on the top of the vehicle. The turret is placed over the second axle. The two remaining mountings for 7.62 mm machine guns on the upper hull sides were removed. Since the turret has been added, the crew had increased from two to three (commander, driver, and gunner). There are two semicircular hatches for the crew in front of the turret. The vehicle carries 500 rounds for the KPVT 14.5 mm heavy machine gun and 3,000 rounds for the PKT 7.62 mm coaxial tank machine gun.
BTR-60PB (1966) - Improved sighting system for 14.5 mm KPVT heavy machine gun and improved GAZ-49B engine. The turret was modified to include a new telescopic sight, the 14.5 mm KPVT heavy machine gun and the 7.62 mm PKT coaxial light machine gun were moved to the right, while the telescopic sight was mounted coaxially to the left. The armour protection has also been improved. The frontal armour of the BTR-60PB can withstand fire from 7.62 mm bullets from any range, while the rest of its armour can withstand fire from 7.62 mm bullets from 100 m. It has a filtration and over pressurization system for NBC protection. It also has self-sealing tires, a central tire inflation system and antennae mount on the right hand side of the rear of the roof. It has a side door in the left side of the front part of the troop compartment. Some BTR-60PBs also lack one of the firing ports on the left side of the hull. Late production BTR-60PBs have the same sighting improvement as the BTR-70, which consists of a small additional episcope sight, which faces to the rear on the turret roof. The vehicle carries 500 rounds for 14.5 mm KPVT heavy machine gun and 3,000 rounds for 7.62 mm PKT coaxial light machine gun. It was also known under the designation GAZ-49B.
BTR-60PB produced during the BTR-80 production run. It has a side door in the right side of the front part of the troop compartment.
BTR-60PB converted into an agitation and propaganda vehicle. It is fitted with the same turret as the BTR-70ZS.
BTR-60PB converted into a command vehicle equipped with two side-mounted angled telescopic masts.
GAZ-4907 - BTR-60PB converted into a specialized chassis used by a few command variants.
BTR-60PBK (K stands for komandnyj - "command") (1975) - Company commander version, based on the specialized chassis GAZ-4907. This version is equipped with three radio sets (two R-123 and one R-148), as well as three whip antennas and an antenna mast on the left upper hull. Late-production models have a modified turret and additional Pin Stick antenna.
BTR-60R-145BM "Chaika" - Turret-less command vehicle, based on the GAZ-4907 chassis and fitted with a collapsible AZI frame antenna, the AMU 10 m high telescopic mast, the AB-1-P/30 generator, five radio sets (one R-123MT, one R-130, two R-111 and one R-012M) as well as the TA-57 field telephone. It is also known under the designation BTR-60PU.
BTR-60R-145BM-1 - Modernized model.
BTR-60R-149BM - Command vehicle based on BTR-60R-145BM-1.
BTR-60PZ (zenitnyj) (1972) - Version with an improved turret similar to that on the BTR-70, which can be used to fire at flying targets. It's equipped with the 1PZ-2 roof-mounted periscope mounted on the turret. The armament has a high angle of elevation. It entered service in very small numbers.
BTR-60 1V18 "Klyon-1" - BTR-60PB converted into an artillery command and forward observer vehicle, used by battery commanders of units equipped with towed artillery and MRL systems. The original turret has been replaced by an unarmed one ("Darth Vader") with the NNP-21 and DV observation devices and a rangefinder. Other specialized equipment comprises the UD-15G internal generator, four radio sets (three R-123M and one R-107M), as well as the 1V510 computer, the PUO-9M fire control set and the PAB-2A aiming circle. Crew consisted of five soldiers. Each 1V17 "Mashina-B" set consists of three 1V18s, one 1V19 (qv), three 1V110s (based on GAZ-66) and one 1V111 (based on ZIL-131).
BTR-60 1V18-1 - Modernized model.
BTR-60 1V19 "Klyon-2" - BTR-60PB converted into an artillery fire direction center externally identical to the BTR-60 1V18 but provided with the R-130M radio set and an additional stowage box on each upper side of the hull. Used by battalion commanders.
BTR-60 1V19-1 - Modernized model.
BTR-60 R-145BM - BTR-60PB converted into a turret-less communications vehicle and equipped with five radio sets: two R-111 or R-171, one R-123 or R-173, one R-130M, and one R-012M.
BTR-60PU-12 (9S482) (punkt upravleniya) (1972) - BTR-60PB converted into an air defense command vehicle and used by units equipped with ZSU-23-4, SA-9 or SA-13. The turret was removed and the vehicle was fitted with the AMU telescope mast on the right side of the front hull roof and the AB1-P/30 1 kW generator on top of the blanking plate. The vehicle is equipped with the 1G13 gyroscope, the KP-4 navigation apparatus and the ASPD-12 computer. Often, the PU-12 is connected to a radar and the radar image is directly visible on the vehicle's IT-45 monitor. BTR-60PU-12M can process up to 12 targets.
BTR-60PU-12M (9S482M) - Modernized model developed in the 1980s for units equipped with more modern SAM systems. This model is equipped with the more modern ASPD-U computer instead of the ASPD-12 and with the S 23-1 data processing unit connected to the MP-21, MP-22, Strela-10M, Osa-AK etc. BTR-60PU-12M can process up to 99 targets instead of only 12.
BTR-60R-975 - Vehicle used by Tactical Air Control Parties, equipped with four radio sets (R-123, R-134, R-853 and R-864), as well as the SMI-2 km beacon system (protected by a conical cover during transport) and the G-290B generator. It has two blade antennas on the rear of the deck.
BTR-60R-975M1 - Modernized version. It doesn't have the conical cover for the beakon system.
BTR-60R-137B - BTR-60PB converted into a USW signals vehicle similar to the BTR-60R-140BM. It is equipped with two radio sets: R-123 and R-405. It also has a frame antennae around the top of the hull and a telescopic mast on the right side of the front of personnel compartment's roof.
BTR-60R-140BM - BTR-60PB converted into a SW signals vehicle similar to the BTR-60R-137B. It is equipped with three radio sets: R-140, R-405, R-123.
BTR-60R-156BTR - BTR-60PB converted into a HF signals vehicle used on the operational level. It is equipped with the R-156 HF radio and two other radio sets: R-405 and R-123.
BTR-60R-409BM - BTR-60PB converted into a radio relay station similar to the BTR-60R-419BR equipped with the R-409 radio set.
BTR-60R-419BR - BTR-60PB converted into a low-frequency radio relay station similar to the BTR-60R-409BM.
BTR-60E-351BR - BTR-60PB converted into a battery charger vehicle used by signals units. It is equipped with a 20 kW generator. The vehicle has an extra seat and carries fuel inside for the generator.
BTR-60P-238BT - BTR-60PB converted into a switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telegrafnoj svyazi).
BTR-60P-239BT - BTR-60PB converted into a switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telegrafnoj svyazi).
BTR-60P-240BT - BTR-60PB converted into a switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telefonnoj svyazi).
BTR-60P-241BT - BTR-60PB converted into a switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telegrafnoj svyazi).
BTR-60MS - BTR-60PB converted into a communications Vehicle fitted with a "High Ball" antennae mount.
BTR-60MBP (MBP stands for mashina boyevogo posta) - BTR-60PB converted into a base security vehicle for Strategic Rocket units. The original turret has been replaced by a new type armed with NSVT 12.7 mm heavy machine gun and equipped with an improved 1PN22M1 sight, loudspeakers, OU-3GA-2 IR search lights and additional TNPO-170 periscopes. The vehicle is also equipped with a stowage box on the right side of the hull. Behind the right side troop compartment roof hatch, there's a small bolted on plate.
(BTR-70)
Russia
BTR-60PBM - BTR-60PB modernization fitted with a new engine in a new, bigger engine compartment similar to the one in the BTR-80. The exhaust pipes are also similar, if not identical, to the ones in BTR-80s. The right side of the hull has been altered: a side door with a small hand rail for the troop compartment was added, four out of five handrails were removed (the exception being the lower front one), the firing ports were replaced with one located next to the gunner's station and a stowage box was added next to the engine compartment. The modernization is done by the Arzamas Engineering Plant.
MWS - Another upgrade of the BTR-60 was developed by Muromteplovoz JSC. This one is powered by the YaMZ-236A 195 hp diesel engine in a much bigger engine compartment, with a service hatch on the rear side and only one exhaust pipe, on the left side. The first prototype - sometimes called BTR-60BD - was in fact an upgraded R-145BM command vehicle. The vehicle that was shown during IDELF-2006 in Moscow was a modified BTR-60PB with the original machine gun turret replaced by the MB2 modular turret with a 2A42 30 mm gun.
MWS-M - MWS with altered sides of the hull. On the left side, two handrails were removed (the center lower and the rear lower) and a stowage box was added in the center. On the right side, two handrails were removed (the center upper and lower), a new handrail was added to the upper rear. The firing ports were removed on both sides.
The latest upgrade was shown for the first time during MAKS-2011. This version also has a new diesel engine, the YaMZ-236D (as found on the BTR-70D upgrade), but here the engine compartment has been relocated to the center of the hull. The troop compartment with eight seats is now at the very end of the hull, has a raised roof line and two exit doors. There are no periscopes for the infantry squad and only two firing ports, in the rear doors. On top of the troop compartment is a new MA7-02 turret. This turret is fitted with a 1PZ-7A sight and armed with a 12.7 mm machine gun "Kord", an automatic grenade launcher AG-17, a coaxial machine gun PKTM 7.62 mm and 81 mm smoke grenade launchers 902V.
9K35M3-K "Kolchan" - During MAKS-2007, Muromteplovoz showed a SAM launch vehicle, based on an upgraded BTR-60 and armed with the Strela-10 launcher fitted to the hull roof.
Irtish - BTR-60PB converted into civilian repair vehicle. It has a crane mounted in the front of the hull and a crate on top of the hull. The turret was removed. It is also missing two hand rails, one in the center of the upper side of the hull and one in the center of the lower side of the hull. The firing ports are blocked. The steel covers for the windshields are removed. The periscopes were removed. A window was added on the front part of each side of the hull.
BTR-60PB converted into a civilian armoured firefighting vehicle. The turret and center hand rails were removed and all firing ports were blocked. The steel covers for the windshields were removed, as were the periscopes. A window was added on the front part of each side of the hull. It was fitted with a crate on top of the hull.
BTR-60PPM - BTR-60PB converted into a civilian armoured firefighting vehicle. The turret and center hand rails were removed, as were the steel covers for the windshields. The firing ports were all blocked, as were the periscopes. Three windows were added on each side of the hull. It was fitted with a crate on top of the hull. It also carries an A-crane on the right side of the hull.
Bulgaria
BTR-60PAU - BTR-60PA converted into an artillery command vehicle equipped with 4 whip antennas.
BTR-60PB experimentally fitted with the Polish WAT turret from SKOT-2AP. Only a prototype was made.
BTR-60PB-MD (bronyetransport'or moderniziran) - BTR-60PB modernization fitted with the VAMO DT3900 or Rover TD-200 diesel engine, four MB smoke grenade launchers on the turret (two on each side), "Melopa" night sight, new day sight, new NBC protection system, modern radios. It also has a rear view mirror on the left hand side of the hull and side hatches. Only a prototype was made.
BTR-60PB-MD1 - BTR-60PB-MD variant developed for the Bulgarian army, fitted with the Cummins ISB 25.30 turbocharged diesel engine developing 250 hp (186 kW), additional protection for its headlights and eight smoke grenade launchers on the turret (four on each side). 150 in service.
BTR-60PB-MD3 - Export BTR-60PB-MD variant fitted with the KamAZ diesel engine, different sights, eight smoke grenade launchers in right-hand corner of the front of the hull and six on the turret (three on each side). It is also known under the designation BTR-60PB-MD2. The prototype, shown in 2004, was based on the BTR-60PA.
Cuba
BTR-60PB fitted with a turret from the BMP-1. It also lacks the hand rails on the upper side of the hull.
BTR-60PB armed with 100 mm gun in a heavily modified turret from the T-54. The hull is modified as well since the two hand rails on the side of the hull are gone and the other two are moved to the center of the hull between the upper and lower parts of the side of the hull. The lights in the front received armoured protection. The vehicle has two rear-view mirrors in the front corners of the hull (one on each side) The chassis has also been modified as the vehicle has a BTR-80 style straight chassis with no slope near the engine compartment. Because of the size of the new turret the vehicle is most probably no longer an APC but an armoured car.
BTR-60 armed with twin 23 mm anti-aircraft guns (probably ZU-23-2). It is designed to be used for anti-aircraft purposes.
BTR-60 armed with twin 37 mm anti-aircraft guns. It is designed to be used for anti-aircraft purposes.
Djibouti
BTR-60PB with its turret replaced by the one used in the French Panhard AML-90 light armoured car. Only one BTR-60PB was converted and it was done so to make use of a spare turret after the original AML-90 hull was destroyed in a road accident.
Finland
BTR-60PA - Only one vehicle.
BTR-60PB fitted with stowage racks over the engine decks.
BTR-60PBK - BTR-60PB upgrade with second radio transceiver telescope radio antenna and outside the vehicle on the deck an aggregate, cable wheel and equipment box.
BTR-60PUM - BTR-60R-145BM "Chaika" upgrade with new communication equipment and armed with the NSV 12.7 mm heavy machine gun.
Finland bought later two BTR-80s for testing out a replacement but ended up buying the domestic XA-180 series of vehicles, known later as Patria Pasi.
Former East Germany
SPW-60P (SPW stands for Schützenpanzerwagen) - NVA designator for BTR-60P.
SPW-60PA (SPW stands for Schützenpanzerwagen) - NVA designator for BTR-60PA.
SPW-60PA(S) - SPW-60PA converted into a staff vehicle.
SPW-60PB (SPW stands for Schützenpanzerwagen) - NVA designator for the BTR-60PB.
SPW-60PB(ABS) (ABS stands for Artillerie-Beobachtungsstelle - "Artillery-Monitoring Center") - SPW-60PB converted into an artillery forward observer vehicle with 4 whip antennas (2 on the rear of the engine deck's roof), two small brackets on the top of the upper left-hand side of the hull with striped poles stowed, commander's and driver's hatches that fold forward horizontally and a modified commanders position with retractable observation device.
SPW-60PB(BBS) (BBS stands for Batterie-Beobachtungsstelle - "Battery-Monitoring Center") - SPW-60PB converted into a command vehicle for air-defense artillery batteries. Similar to the SPW-60PB but it has two whip antennas on the rear hull.
SPW-60PB(S) - SPW-60PB converted into a command vehicle.
NZ(B) MSR/PR (NZ stands for Nachrichtenzentrale) - SPW-60PB converted into a signals vehicle for motorized rifle and tank regiments. It is equipped with the R-123M, R-123MT and R-405 radio sets, the AB-2-0 generator mounted behind the turret and the F-1301 electronic telegraph. Turret has been blanked-off.
LBGS(B) (LBGS stands for Leitungsbaugerätesatz) - SPW-60PB converted into telephone cable layer. It is also known under the designation LBT.
R-137B - SPW-60PB converted into a signals vehicle. Differs externally from Soviet type and has some components from local production including the FF63M field telephone set.
R-140BM - SPW-60PB converted into a signals vehicle equipped with R-140M SW radio set, two movable whip antennas in the rear, a 10 m high telescopic mast and the AB-4-T/230-M1 generator. It differs externally from its Soviet counterpart and incorporates some components produced locally including the EKD 315 SW receiver.
R-409BM - SPW-60PB converted into a radio-relay station equipped with 2 R-409MA semi-sets, free receivers: the R-326, the R-123MT, the P-303-OB and the AB-2-0/230-M1 generator.
R-145BM/AKL1 - SPW-60PB converted into a signals vehicle. It is a R-145BM equipped with an additional R-870M set.
R-145BM/AKL2 - Signals vehicle. As R-145BM but with additional R-809M2 set.
R-145BM/L1 - Signals vehicle.
R-145BM/L2I - Signals vehicle with radiosets R-111, R-123MT, R-130M, R-809M2, R-859D and R-863 of R-802.
P-238BT - Switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telegrafnoj svyazi) SAS- and Chiffrier Services.
P-239BT - Switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telegrafnoj svyazi) SAS- and Chiffrier Services.
P-240BT - Switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telefonnoj svyazi) SAS- and Chiffrier Services.
P-241BT - Switchboard vehicle (kompleksnaya apparatnaya telegrafnoj svyazi) SAS- and Chiffrier Services.
Iran
Sedad - Version of the BTR-60PB with the turret replaced with a 23 mm ZU-23-2 cannon installed with an optical device and CCD camera to allow the gunner to fire from inside the vehicle with day/night firing capability.
Shahram - Modified BTR-60PB as a nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical (NRBC) detection lab. Has a single door on the left side of the hull, turret replaced with a range of detection and optics as a camera mounted on a mast, and a remote weapon station with a 7.62 mm machine gun and a bank of four smoke grenade dischargers on each side at the front of the hull.
Heidar-5 - Minelayer version of the BTR-60PB with turret and crew compartment removed to place an automatic firing unit. The mine launching assembly has 18 mine launcher units mounted on each side of the hull, with each mine launcher unit having two preloaded magazines, each of which holds two anti-tank or anti-personnel mines. They can be ejected to create a mine barrier while the vehicle is moving. The front of the Heidar-5 is armed with a remotely-operated DShK heavy machine gun.
Heidar-6 - Upgunned BTR-60PB equipped with a BMP-1 turret armed with a 73 mm cannon fed through a 40-round magazine, 7.62 mm coaxial machine gun, and AT-3 Sagger wire-guided anti-tank missile with one carried in the launch position and two reloads that are loaded by a rail through a hatch in the forward part of the turret roof.
Heidar-7 - BTR-60PB equipped with Explosive reactive armour tiles, a new unmanned turret equipped with a singular 23 mm auto-cannon, internal display panels, and an improved engine.
Israel
BTR-60PB fitted with the CARDOM 120/81 mm mortar system in its troop compartment. The turret and the roof over the troop compartment have been removed. The roof over the crew compartment along with both hatches remains. A ladder was added to at least one side of the hull to allow easier mounting and dismounting. It was designed by Soltam.
BTR-60 upgrade designed by Nimda fitting it with new power unit and automatic transmission which improves both mobility and reliability.
BTR-60 modernization designed by Saymar. The following operations were carried out as a part of this modernization:
1) Removing all of the vehicle's systems and parts.
2) Adding a bolted-on superstructure with two hatches in its front, going all the way from the front hatches to the engine compartment which is necessary to adapt the vehicle to the new systems and parts. (The engine compartment now externally resembles the Russian MWS one. However it does not have a service hatch in the back and is angled near the top, also it has rear lights mounted on both sides of the engine compartment although the lights themselves are different.)
3) Sandblasting and repainting the hull.
4) Reassembling the vehicle with new and improved systems and parts as well as installing a new split transfer box that includes a limited split differential and a monitoring system allowing driving in rough terrain and improving the cross-country capabilities.
5) Replacing the two GAZ-40P petrol engines with a single Caterpillar diesel engine developing 300 hp.
6) Fitting a number of new parts for the new engine including a clutch system, split gear case, axillary engine systems, cooling systems, air inlet system, exhaust system.
7) Converting and adapting a new fuel system for the diesel engine and integrating new and bigger fuel tanks to increase the maximum operational range.
8) Installing a new and advanced electrical system including an advanced control panel and the replacement of all internal and external lighting.
9) Increasing the driver's field of view by installing a rearview camera with an LCD screen.
10) Improving the man-machine interface. The vehicle is armed with a pintle-mounted M2 heavy machine gun in the front and a second machine gun of a smaller caliber mounted on a "ring" in the rear. The rear machine gun is controlled from the inside, using the "ring" to move and can rotate a full 360°. The vehicle also has two whip antennas in the front part of the superstructure. The modernization can also be applied to the BTR-70.
Mexico
APC-70 - Turret-less APC used by the Mexican marines, based on a civilian variant of the BTR-60 without firing ports, periscopes and with additional bulletproof windows. Armament consists of a single machine gun (either the Heckler & Koch HK21 or FN MAG-58 7.62) or a Mk 19 grenade launcher. It is also known under the designation BTR-60PB-MX.
APC-70 fitted with an A-frame crane.
People's Republic of China
BTR-60PB copy designed through reverse engineering.
Poland
BTR-60PB fitted with an additional radio set.
BTR-60PB modified by the MSW automobile plant for use during the martial law in Poland by ZOMO fitted with a two-sided breaker, weighing 1.5 tonnes, mounted to the front of the vehicle and a counter weight mounted to the rear of the vehicle. The breaker itself is made out of rail tracks and a dozen mm thick plate. It also has an additional protection on the OU-3 infrared searchlight as well as aerial seatbelts for the driver and commander.
Romania
TAB-71 series (TAB stands for transportor amfibiu blindat - "amphibious armored carrier") - Romania was the only other country to produce the BTR-60PB. When the Army of the Socialist Republic of Romania explored the possibility of license-producing the BTR-60PB in the late 1960s, the Soviets consented, probably to preempt further collaboration between Romania and the "heretic" Yugoslavs.
TAB-71 - The initial turretless version, entered production in 1970. It was essentially a BTR-60P with two Romanian 140 hp engines instead of the regular 90 hp engines. This version was produced in small numbers.
TAB-71M - Occasionally called TAB-72. This was a version of the BTR-60PB with a modified turret and uprated engines. The sole external difference between a BTR-60PB and a TAB-71M is the protruding gun sight on the left side of the turret of the Romanian vehicle. The Romanian-modified turret allows anti-aircraft fire, thus increasing the combat value of this Romanian license-built Soviet vehicle.
TAB-71A R-1 450 - Command version.
TAB-71A R-1 451 - Command version.
TAB-71A R-1 452 - Command version.
TAB-71AR - Occasionally called TAB-73. This version carried a 82 mm mortar mounted in the superstructure of the troop compartment, where the turret would usually be. When it was revealed to the public in November 1975, it became the first known mortar-carrying APC of a Warsaw Pact army other than that of the Soviet Union.
TERA-71 (tractor de evacuare şi reparat auto) - Maintenance and recovery version.
TERA-71L (tractor de evacuare şi reparat auto) - Maintenance and recovery version.
Yemen
BTR-60PB with its turret replaced by the one used in the French Panhard AML-90 light armoured car. This was functionally identical to the same conversion carried out in Djibouti, but initiated on a larger scale. Multiple Yemeni BTR-60PBs received this upgrade in mid 2014.

Operators

Current operators
 Afghanistan: 600 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1978 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1979 and 1986 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). A number of BTR-60s bought from Russia in 2002. 300 BTR-60s are currently in service.
 Algeria: 400 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1977 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1978 and 1981 (the vehicles were possibly previously in Soviet service). 10 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered along with 10 9K31 SAM batteries in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1979 and 1980. At peak there were 530 BTR-60s in service. Currently 400 BTR-60s and OT-64 SKOTs are in service.
 Angola: 74 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1975 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1975 and 1976. 175 BTR-60PBs and BTR-60PB-based command vehicles were ordered in 1980 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1985 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service, some could be BTR-50P). 250 BTR-60PBs and BTR-60PB-based command vehicles were ordered in 1987 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1987 and 1988 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 90 BTR-60s in service in 2000. 100 BTR-60s are currently in service.
 Azerbaijan: 15 in service with the armed forces in 1992, 11 in 1993, 8 in 1994, 25 in 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004 and 23 in 2006. 21 in service with the internal forces in 1992 and 1993, 2 in 1994, 3 in 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006. 12 in service with the boundary forces in 1992 and 1993, 13 in 1994, 19 in 1995 and 1996, 14 in 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006.
 Belarus: 221 in service in 1995 and 188 in 2000, 2003 and 2005.
 Bhutan: 27 donated by India. All currently active.
 Botswana: 30 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1981 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1981 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). 30 BTR-60s in service in 2001. Currently 50 BTR-60s are in service.
 Bulgaria: Currently 150 BTR-60PBs in service, modernized to the BTR-60PB-MD1 standard. 900 BTR-60Ps and BTR-60PAUs were ordered in 1962 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1964 and 1972 (some of the delivered vehicles were most probably BTR-60PB).
 Cambodia: 40 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1989 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1990 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). At peak there were 210 BTR-60s. Currently 160 BTR-60s are in service.
 Chad: Currently 20 are in service.
 China: Captured 4 BTR-60PBs from the Soviet Union during the Sino-Soviet border conflict in March 1969. Produced and operated a small number of copies designed through reverse engineering.
 Congo-Brazzaville: 28 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1984 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1984 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). Currently 30 BTR-60s are in service.
 Congo-Kinshasa: 30 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 2000 from Ukraine and delivered in 2000 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet and later Ukrainian service). 6 more BTR-60s were bought from Ukraine on the same year. Currently 30-70 BTR-60PBs are in service.
 Cuba: 150 BTR-60Ps were ordered in 1961 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1962 and 1964. Cuba also bought a number of BTR-60PBs. 10 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered along with 40 9K31 SAM systems in 1984 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1985 and 1986. Currently 400 BTR-60s are in service.
 Djibouti: 12 BTR-60PBs ordered in 1979 from Iraq and received as aid in 1980 (the vehicles were previously in Iraqi service). 1 was later fitted with a turret from the French AML-90 light armoured car. (See Djibouti section for details).
 Egypt: A few hundred BTR-60s and BTR-152s acquired before June 1967. 650 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1969 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1970 and 1973. Currently 200 BTR-60PBs are in service.
 Eritrea: Currently 65 are in service.
 Ethiopia: 100 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1977 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1977 and 1978 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 200 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1980 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1980 and 1981 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 250 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1984 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1985 and 1986 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). Currently 80 BTR-60PBs are in service.
 Ghana: Currently 6 are in service.
 Guinea: 8 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1983 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1983 (the vehicles were second hand). Currently 8 are in service.
 Guinea-Bissau: 15 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1979 (the vehicles were probably second hand). Currently 35 are in service.
 India: 56 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1977. 50 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered along with 200 9K31 SAM systems in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1979 and 1984. At peak there were 817 BTR-60s in service. 50 BTR-60PBs were in service in 1990, none in service in 1995. BTR-60PU-12s are probably still in service.
 Iran: 300 BTR-60Ps were ordered in 1966 from the Soviet Union along with 270 BTR-50s as a $110mln deal and delivered between 1967 and 1968. 200 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1986 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1986 and 1987 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). Currently 150 are in service.
 Israel: Captured a number from Egypt or Syria. Some of them have been converted into mortar carriers (See Israel section for details).
 Kazakhstan: There were 300 BTR-60s and BTR-50s in service in 2000, 2002 and 2005.
 Kenya: Currently 24 are in service.
 Kyrgyzstan: There were 96 in service in 1995 and 53 in 2000 and 2005.
 Laos: 35 BTR-60Ps were ordered in 1980 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1982 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). Currently 70 are in service. BTR-60s have been seen in service as recently as January 2019.
 Liberia: 8 TAB-71s ordered in 1986 from Romania and delivered in 1987 (the vehicles were previously in Romanian service, part of a deal worth $4 million).
 Libya: 100 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1974 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1975. 60 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1976. At peak there were 750 BTR-60s in service. 700 BTR-50s and BTR-60s were in service in 1986. Currently 540 BTR-50s and BTR-60s are in service.
 Mali: 10 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1982 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1982 (the vehicles were probably second hand). Up to 44 in service in 2013.
 Mexico: Bought 30 BTR-60-based firefighting variants from Irtish company and converted them into APC-70s. All in service with the marine units.
 Moldova: 27 BTR-60PBs inherited from the Soviet Union in 1991. 161 TAB-71Ms ordered in 1992 from Romania and delivered between 1992 and 1995 (the vehicles were previously in Romanian service). Currently 12 BTR-60PBs and 121 TAB-71Ms are in service.
 Mongolia: 50 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1975 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1975 and 1976. Currently 300 BTR-60s are in service.
 Morocco: Currently more than 45 are in service.
 Mozambique: 30 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1977 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1977 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 60 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1986 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). More than 150 BTR-60s in service in 2001. Currently 150 BTR-60s are in service.
 Namibia: 10 BTR-60s in service in 2001.
 Nicaragua: 84 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1981 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1988 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). Currently 64 BTR-60PBs are in service.
 Nigeria: Currently 6 are in service.
 North Korea: 100 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1974 and 1975. There were 1,010 Korshuns, VTT-323s, Type 63s (YW-531), BTR-40s, BTR-50s, BTR-60s and BTR-152s in service in 1985, 2,200 VTT-323s, Type 63s (YW-531), BTR-40s, BTR-50s, BTR-60s and BTR-152s in service in 1990 and 1995 and 2,500 VTT-323s, Type 63s (YW-531), BTR-40s, BTR-50s, BTR-60s and BTR-152s in service in 2000, 2002 and 2005. Currently 1,000 BTR-60s are in service.
 People's Defense Units (YPG)
 Peru: Currently 12 are in service.
 Russia: There were 4,900 BTR-60s, BTR-70s and BTR-80s in service in 2002 and 2003 including 750 in service with the Naval infantry and 280 in service the coastal defense forces. 6,000 BTR-50s, BTR-60s, BTR-70s, BTR-80s and BTR-152s in service in 2000, 2005 and 2008. Currently 17 are in active service and some are kept in storage.
 Rwanda
 Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic
 Serbia: 10
 Somalia: 10 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1976. 5 are currently in service.
 Sudan
 Syria: 150 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1970 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1970 and 1971. 500 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1973 and 1975. Around 1,500 BTR-40s, BTR-50s, BTR-60PBs, BTR-152s and OT-64s in service in 1990, 1995 and 2000 and around 1,600 in 2001, 2003 and 2005. 600 BTR-60PBs are currently in service.
 Tajikistan: 7 were inherited from Soviet Union. 1 in service in 2000 and 2005.
 Transnistria
 Turkmenistan: There were 543 BTR-60s, BTR-70s and BTR-80s in service in 1995 and 829 in 2000 and 2005.
 Uganda: 20 BTR-60s in service in 1999.
 Ukraine: 500 were inherited from the Soviet Union. 220 in service in 1995, 202 in 2000 and 176 in 2005.
 Uzbekistan: There were 24 in service in 2000 and 2005. Currently 24 are in service.
 Vietnam: 500 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1978 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1978 and 1980 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). Currently 400 BTR-60s are in service.
 Yemen: Currently 500 are in service.
 Zambia: 13 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1980 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service, part of the deal worth between $72 million and $100 million). Currently 13 are in service.
Former operators
 Armenia: 25 in service with the armed forces in 1994, 19 in 1995, 1996, 14 in 1997 and 1998, 11 in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006. 3 in service with the ministry of internal affairs in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006. 5 in service with the ministry of national safety in 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006. Some in service with the police.
 Croatia: 16 TAB-71s captured from JNA and later scrapped. In 1998 there were 17 MT-LBs, BOVs and LOV variants in service with the Croatian army and BTR-60s in service with the police.
 Czechoslovakia: 28 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered along with 28 9K31 SAM batteries in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1980 and 1989. 5 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered in 1982 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1982 and 1984 (used in 5 9K33M Osa-M SAM batteries). 25 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered in 1984 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1984 and 1990 (used in 25 9K35 Strela-10 SAM batteries).
 East Germany: 1,500 SPW-60Ps, SPW-60PAs and SPW-60PBs were ordered in 1963 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1965 and 1970. 24 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered along with 24 9K31 SAM batteries in 1978 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1979 and 1984. 260 SPW-60PAs and 2,000 SPW-60PBs (including variants) were passed on to the unified German state.
 Estonia: 2. Withdrawn from service.
 Finland: 120 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1975 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1976. Withdrawn from service in 2006.
 Germany: 260 SPW-60PA and 2,000 SPW-60PB (including variants), taken from GDR's army; all scrapped or sold to other countries.
 Georgia: 3 BTR-60s and BTR-70s used in War in Abkhazia (1992-1993). 1 BTR-60 in service in 2005 and 2008.
 Grenada: 6 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1981 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1982 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service).
 Hungary: 150 BTR-60Ps were ordered in 1961 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1963. 7 BTR-60PU-12s were ordered along with 7 9K35 SAM batteries in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1979 and 1983.
 Iraq: 250 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1970 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1971 and 1975. At peak there were 500 BTR-60s in service. There were 3,500 BTR-50s, BTR-60s, BTR-152s, EE-11 Urutus, Panhard M3s, M113A1s, M113A2s, OT-62 TOPASess, OT-64 SKOTs and Walids in service in 1990, around 2,000 BTR-50s, BTR-60s, BTR-152s, EE-11 Urutus, Panhard M3s, MT-LBs, OT-62 TOPASes, OT-64 SKOTs, Walids and YW-701s in 1995, around 2,400 BTR-50s, BTR-60s, BTR-152s, EE-11 Urutus, Panhard M3s, MT-LBs, OT-62 TOPASes, OT-64 SKOTs, Walids and YW-701s in 2000 and around 2,400 BTR-50s, BTR-60s, BTR-152s, EE-11 Urutus, Panhard M3s, MT-LBs, M113A1s, M113A2s, OT-62 TOPASes, OT-64 SKOTs, Walids and YW-701s in 2002.
 Lebanon: 18 BTR-60PBs delivered by Iraq to the Lebanese Forces between 1986 and 1989. 10 BTR-60PBs delivered by Israel to the South Lebanon Army in 1982. Unknown number of vehicles delivered by Syria and Libya to the Druze People's Liberation Army militia between 1983 and 1987.
 Lithuania: 15 BTR-60PBs (in some sources - BTR-60PA) were ordered in 1992 from Russia and delivered in 1992 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet and later Russian service, some lacked their armament). 14 BTR-60PBs were bought in 1995 from Russia. There were 27 BTR-60PBs in service in 2006 and 2007. Currently 20 BTR-60s are in service.
 North Macedonia: 31 BTR-60P retired.
 Poland: Several BTRs were used by the People's Army of Poland, but were not accepted in armaments because of the competing Polish-Czech OT-64 SKOT, so they were sold to ZOMO. In 1981-1982, 40 transporters were delivered in the PB version for ZOMO and the Milicja Obywatelska. After 1989 they were sent to the Policja, where they are withdrawn for the moment, or are in stock. Some have been handed over to museums.
 Romania: Produced 1,872 TAB-71s, TAB-71Ms, TERA-71s, TERA-71Ls, TAB-71A R-1450s, TAB-71A R-1451s, TAB-71A R-1452s and 491 TAB-71ARs between 1970 and 1990 for the Romanian army. More were produced for export. The vehicle was the main APC of the Romanian Socialist Army, accounting for over 70% of its APCs. In 2009, 965 TAB-71s, TERA-71s, TERA-71Ls, TAB-71A R-1450s, TAB-71A R-1451s, TAB-71A R-1452s and 491 TAB-71ARs were in service.
 Soviet Union: Produced around 25,000 BTR-60s. 35,500 BTR-50s, BTR-60s, BTR-70s, BTR-80s and BTR-152s in service in 1985. 4,191 BTR-60s in service with units station in the European part of Soviet Union in 1990. Passed on to successor states.
 North Yemen: 150 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1980 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service).
 South Yemen: 100 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1981 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1982 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 40 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1986 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1986 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service).
 Turkey: 300 SPW-60PBs were ordered in 1990 from Germany with 195 being delivered between 1990 and 1991 and 105 being delivered in 1992 (the vehicles were previously in East German service, part of the CFE Cascade programme). 23 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1993 from Russia and delivered in 1993 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet and later Russian service, part of a $75M deal, used by the police). All now phased out of Turkish Armed Forces service, used only by Gendarmerie General Command.
 Yugoslavia: 80 BTR-60Ps were ordered in 1965 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1966. 40 TAB-71s were ordered in 1978 from Romania and delivered between 1980 and 1981 (used by the police).
 Zaire: 10 BTR-60PBs were ordered in 1980 from an unknown supplier and delivered in 1980 (the vehicles were probably second-hand). Passed on to the successor state.

OT-64 SKOT - Polish/Czechoslovak equivalent to the Soviet BTR-60
BTR-70 - Successor to the BTR-60
BTR-80
BTR-90

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