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T-62 - ОБТ (СССР), продолжение

T-62 - ...ПРОДОЛЖЕНИЕ

Variants

Former Soviet Union
T-62A (Ob'yekt 165) - Predecessor of T-62. It was essentially a stretched T-55 chassis with a 2245 mm turret ring, a new suspension, and an Ob'yekt 140 turret modernised with the addition of a spent-cartridge ejector; tank gun equipped with the "Kometa" two-plane stabiliser. Only five entered service.
T-62 Obr.1960 (Ob'yekt 166) - Original production model equipped with the 115 mm U-5TS "Molot" (2A20) Rapira smoothbore tank gun with a "Meteor" two-plane stabiliser. It has a TKN-3 commander's day/night sight, TSh-2B-41 gunner day sight with 3.5/7x magnification and TPN1-41-11 night sight. It carries 40 rounds for the main gun and 2500 rounds for the PKT coaxial general-purpose machine gun. The V-55V engine produces 581 hp (433 kW). It has a commander's cupola welded to turret.
T-62K (Ob'yekt 166K) (K stands for komandirskaya ["command"]) (1964) - T-62 command variant. It is fitted with an R-112 (or R-130) radio, an AB-1 APU and an antenna base on top of the turret. The ammunition load was decreased to 36 for the main gun and 1,750 rounds for the coaxial general-purpose machine gun. It was mainly used by company and battalion commanders.
T-62KN (Ob'yekt 166KN) - T-62K fitted with additional TNA-2 navigation aids.
Ob'yekt 167 - T-62 fitted with a V-26 engine which with a use of charger develops 700 hp (522 kW). It has a 9M14 Malyutka (NATO: AT-3 Sagger) ATGM launcher on the rear of turret and a new chassis with return rollers and smaller road wheels. Not produced. Only two prototypes were made.
Ob'yekt 167T - Ob'yekt 167 fitted with a GTD-3T gas turbine engine.
T-62 Obr.1967 - T-62 Obr.1960 with a slightly modified engine deck and an OPVT deep wading system.
T-62 Obr.1972 - T-62 Obr.1967 with a DShK 1938/46 machine gun installed on the loader's hatch. The tank is fitted with an improved fording attachment. It is sometimes incorrectly called T-62A and T-62M.
T-62 Obr.1975 - T-62 Obr.1972 equipped with a KTD-1 or KTD-2 laser rangefinder in an armoured box over the main armament. It has concealed bolts around the commander's cupola.
T-62D (Ob'yekt 166D) (D stands for Drozd [thrush]) (1983) - T-62 Obr.1975 equipped with KAZ 1030M "Drozd" active protection system (APS), BDD appliqué armour on the glacis plate only and new V-55U diesel engine.
T-62D-1 (Objekt 166D-1) - T-62D fitted with a new V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62M (Ob'yekt 166M) (1983) - Extensive modernization of the T-62 with protection and mobility improvements and the "Volna" fire control system. It is fitted with a BDD appliqué armour package, an additional belly armour plate for anti-mine protection, 10 mm thick reinforced rubber side skirts and 10 mm thick anti-neutron liner. The BDD appliqué armour package brings the frontal armour to nearly equivalent to the early T-64A and T-72 Ural and consists of an appliqué plate on the glacis and two horseshoe shaped blocks fitted to the front of the turret. This armour should be proof against all 84 mm and 90 mm tank gun rounds at all ranges, 105 mm APDS and HEAT, 84 mm and 106 mm recoilless rifle HEAT rounds and many 1st generation anti-tank missiles as well as the M72A3 LAW and RPG-7. The handrails around the turret have been removed to make space for the BDD appliqué armour. Fastenings for four spare track chain links have been added on the side of the turret. The tank is fitted with RhKM tracks from the T-72 main battle tank and two additional shock absorbers on the first pair of road wheels. The "Volna" fire control system was improved by fitting the KTD-2 (or KTD-1) laser rangefinder in an armoured box over the main armament. There is a new TShSM-41U gunner's sight, new commander's sight, "Meteor-M1" stabiliser, BV-62 ballistic computer and 9K116-2 "Sheksna" (NATO: AT-10 Stabber) guided missile unit with 1K13-BOM sight (it is both a night sight and ATGM launcher sight but cannot be used for both functions simultaneously) which allows the tank to fire 9M117 Bastion ATGMs through its gun tube. The tank was fitted with a gun thermal sleeve, new radios, the R-173 radio set instead of R-123M and a new V-55U diesel engine developing 620 hp (462 kW). The ammunition load was increased by two rounds. Some are fitted with two clusters of four smoke grenade launchers each on the right rear of the turret. US intelligence saw T-62M tanks for the first time during the Soviet-Afghan War and they gave it the designation T-62E. There are a number of sub-variants of the T-62M, depending on how much of the modernization package the vehicle has installed.
T-62M-1 (Ob'yekt 166M-1) - T-62M fitted with a V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62M1 (Ob'yekt 166M1) - T-62M fitted with a revised frontal armour layout on the hull and a normal night sight. It does not have ATGM capability.
T-62M1-1 (Ob'yekt 166M1-1) - T-62M1 fitted with the V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62M1-2 (Ob'yekt 166M1-2) - T-62M1 without belly armour or the BDD armour package.
T-62M1-2-1 (Ob'yekt 166M1-2-1) - T-62M1-2 fitted with the V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62MD (Ob'yekt 166MD) (D stands for Drozd ["thrush"]) - T-62M fitted with KAZ 1030M "Drozd" active protection system (APS).
T-62MD-1 (Ob'yekt 166MD-1) - T-62MD fitted with V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62MK (Ob'yekt 166MK) (K stands for komandirskaya ["command"]) - T-62M command variant. It does not have ATGM capability but has TNA-2 navigation aids, additional R-112 and R-113 radio sets and an AB-1 auxiliary engine to power the additional radios. The tank has a lower ammunition load for both the main gun and the coaxial general-purpose machine gun.
T-62MK-1 (Ob'yekt 166MK-1) - T-62MK fitted with the V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62MV (Ob'yekt 166MV) (1985) (V stands for vzryvnoi - ["explosive"]) - Fitted with "Kontakt-1" explosive reactive armour (ERA) on the sides of the hull, the glacis plate, and in the front of the turret (where it replaces the BDD appliqué armour).
T-62MV-1 (Ob'yekt 166MV-1) - T-62MV fitted with the V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62M1V (Ob'yekt 166M1V) - T-62MV without ATGM capability.
T-62M1V-1 (Ob'yekt 166M1V-1) - T-62M1V fitted with a V-46-5M diesel engine.
T-62M (obr. 2021) - modernized model equipped with a multispectral gyro-stabilized optical-electronic system, an electromechanical mast and a new 1PN-96MT-02 sight. "Kontakt-1" ERA and lattice anti-cumulative screens are installed on the tank's sides.
T-62 fitted with a box on the rear of the turret containing anti-aircraft missiles.
T-62 fitted with the ZET-1 (ZET stands for Zaschtschita Ekrannaja Tankowaja) vehicle protection system. The system was developed in 1964 and was specially designed to protect the tank's front and sides up to an angle of 25° against shaped-charge projectiles with of a maximum caliber of 115 mm. It consisted of a stretchable screen with net structure centered on the vehicle's main armament and lateral flipper-type sideskirts. It was intended for T-54, T-55 and T-62 tanks. The diameter of the screens was different for each tank type. The individual screen sections could be replaced in two minutes. While it was successful in wide open spaces, it was an impractical in wooded areas. Because of that the development was not heavily used, although the flipper-type sideskirts were later used in the initial T-72 models.
T-62 experimentally fitted with a "Zhelud" autoloader.
T-62/122 - T-62 based combat engineering vehicle rearmed with 122 mm howitzer.
T-62/160 - T-62 based combat engineer vehicle fitted with BTU and armed with a shortened 160 mm mortar.
T-67 - T-62 armed with a 125 mm tank gun and fitted with a drive train from the T-72 main battle tank.
TO-62 - T-62 converted into a flamethrower tank. The flamethrower has an effective range of 100 meters and is mounted coaxially with the 115 mm gun.
IT-1 (Ob'yekt 150) - T-62 converted into a tank destroyer (istrebitel' tankov). It was developed between 1957 and 1962. It utilised the chassis and the hull of the T-62 tank and was fitted with a new low 'flattened dome' turret with a stabilised 2K8 ATGM system instead of the tank gun. The IT-1 was the only one of several "rocket tank" ('raketniy tank') designs that actually entered service. It could launch radio-guided semi-automatic PTUR 3M7 "Drakon" ATGMs with a range between 300 m and 3,300 m. It carried 15 PTUR 3M7 "Drakon" ATGMs on board (3 in reserve and 12 in the autoloader). The ATGM was launched from an arm rising through the roof of the turret. The secondary armament consisted of a 7.62 mm PKT general-purpose machine gun for which it carried 2,000 rounds. The turret was fitted with T2-PD and UPN-S day/night sights. About 60 IT-1 tank destroyers were built between 1968 and 1970 by various companies including 20 built by the Uralvagonzavod factory in 1970. Only two battalions operated them, one with artillery personnel and one with tank personnel, with one battalion in Belarus MD and the other one in the Carpathian MD. The units were disbanded after the withdrawal of the IT-1 and all the vehicles were converted to armoured recovery vehicles (ARVs).
IT-1T (T after IT-1 stands for tyagach ["tractor"]) - After the withdrawal of the IT-1 from front-line service many of the vehicles were partially converted to ARVs. The only differences from the standard IT-1 was that the turret was fixed in position after all the ATGM gear was removed. They were not very successful and were soon converted into the BTS-4V armoured recovery vehicles.
BTS-4V (BTS stands for bronirovannij tyagach, srednij ["medium armoured tractor"]) - Conversion of T-62 main battle tanks and IT-1 tank destroyers into a turretless ARV. They are similar to the much more common T-54 -based BTS-4. The vehicle was fitted with a stowage basket, a hoist and a small folding crane with a capacity of 3 tonnes, a winch, and a snorkel. It is also known as BTS-4U.
BTS-4V1 - Conversion of approximatively 35 pre-production T-62 main battle tanks into ARVs.
BTS-4V2 - Partial conversion of 20 T-62 main battle tanks damaged by fire into an armoured recovery vehicle. The turret was replaced by a dome-shaped fixed superstructure. There is a single hatch on top of the superstructure fitted with a 12.7 mm DShK 1938/46 antiaircraft heavy machine gun. It was limited to basic towing operations and most were disposed of by giving them away as foreign aid. They were also known as BTS-4VZ.
Impuls-2M - Decommissioned T-62 tank converted into a fire fighting vehicle fitted with a 50-round launch system for flame-retarding projectiles on a rotatable mount in the turret ring and a dozer blade on the front.
Egypt
T-62 modernization made by NORICUM. The modernization includes a replacement of the 115 mm tank gun with a 105 mm Royal Ordnance L7 tank gun. The Egyptian Army evaluated the vehicle and incorporated its upgrades in its RO-115 Mark I modernization.
RO-115 Mark I: developed in the early 1980s. While retaining the Soviet 115 mm gun, more powerful ammunition allows engaging a target at greater range. Some main guns were replaced with the Royal Ordnance L7 105 mm gun as offered by the Austrian firm NORICUM. Other modifications included a British diesel engine developing 750 hp (559 kW), a two-plane stabiliser, ballistic computer, laser rangefinder in an armoured box over the main armament, a cluster of six smoke grenade launchers on the right side of the turret, a fire control system from BMP-3 IFV and additional armour including reactive armour. The upgrades resulted in an increase of weight to 43 tons.
T-62E Mark II: Mid 1990s Egyptian refurbishment and modernization program. The tanks were fitted with a license-built German MTU engine developing 880 hp (656 kW). The tanks are armed with a license-built 105 mm M68 tank gun, an Italian fire control system with ballistics computer, infrared vision device, laser rangefinder, gun stabiliser, additional armour including reactive armour, armoured side skirts, modernised suspension and six smoke grenade launchers on each side of the turret. It has an upgraded NBC (nuclear, biological, and chemical) protection system. The T-62E Mark II carries two Egyptian-made two-round anti-tank missile launchers or two 2-round launchers for 80 mm D-3000 smoke rockets on an encroachment extension, or a box-type launcher holding two Sakr smoke missiles on each side of the turret. The upgrade did not change the weight of the tank, which remained at 45 tons.
RO-120 Mark III: T-62 tank upgrade developed in 2004. This upgrade arms the tank with the 120 mm M-393 tank gun developed by FSUE. The gun is 5.30 m long and weighs 2.6 tonnes. It can be elevated or depressed between -7° and +15°. The tank has a new license-built German MTU engine developing 890 hp (664 kW) and additional armour, including reactive armour and armoured side skirts. The upgrades resulted in a weight increase to 46.5 tons. This upgrade was completed by the end of 2008.
Bulgaria
TV-62 - T-62 tank converted into an armoured recovery vehicle.
T-62 modification.
TV-62M - T-62M tank converted into an armoured recovery vehicle. This vehicle is composed of a T-62M hull with a modified T-55 or T-55A turret which was cut in half; the upper part was bolted onto the hull in the 6 o'clock position. There is a large winch and a snorkel mounted on the rear of the hull.
TP-62 - fire fighting vehicle, for the first time presented during the Hemus 2008 defense equipment trade show. Used in the putting out of the Vitosha 2012 fire.
France
T-62 modernization made by GIAT. The modernization includes a replacement of the 115 mm tank gun with a 120 mm smoothbore tank gun, the same as the one used in the AMX 40 prototype main battle tank. No orders were placed for this unit.
Israel
Israel captured a small number of Syrian T-62s and made limited adaptions for Israeli service, including US-made radio equipment. The Tiran 6 was not as extensively modified as the Tirans 4 and 5. It is reputed that some Tiran-6s were fitted with "Blazer" reactive armour tiles on the glacis and turret, but that remains to be proven by photographic evidence.
A large open stowage bin was fitted to the turret rear, where stowed gear could, unfortunately, obstruct the hatch for the automatic cartridge case ejection system, with a lidded bin on the right of the turret. These bins were similar to those fitted on Tirans 4 and 5. The original 115 mm gun was retained, making IDF dependent on captured ammunition.
The commander's 12.7 mm DShK 1938/46 antiaircraft heavy machine gun was replaced by an M1919 Browning 7.62 mm machine gun, with a mount for a second Browning on the loader's hatch. An M2 Browning 12.7 mm machine gun could be mounted on the mantlet of the main gun as a ranging gun. Tiran 6 was apparently only deployed operationally during Operation Peace For Galilee and was withdrawn from service shortly afterwards as the arrival of further stocks of M60 and M60A1 from the USA made it unnecessary to use the T-62.
North Korea
Ch'ŏnma-ho I (Ga) - This is a lighter and thinner armoured copy of the T-62. Based on general trends and photography of armed forces parades, it is clear that North Korea has made considerable modifications to the basic Soviet and Chinese designs in its own production.
Ch'ŏnma-ho II - designation for an imported T-62.
Ch'ŏnma-ho III - A simple progressive upgrade of the Ch’onma-ho 2, with a thermal sleeve for the main gun and armoured track skirts added. It is possible, but considered unlikely, that lugs for ERA have been added since its introduction; if they are present, they would be most likely found on the glacis and turret sides. A night vision upgrade.
Ch'ŏnma-ho IV - Greatly upgraded armour protection, including composite armour on the glacis and turret front, and appliqué or thickened armour elsewhere. Even the appliqué and/or thickened armour appears to be more advanced than earlier models, and does not appear to have gained a huge amount of weight. A ballistic computer was added to the fire control suite, and the fire control suite has been integrated into a complete system rather than being a patchwork of upgrades. Gun stabilization has been improved. Radios are improved, and the suspension beefed up. The new engine is a 750-horsepower model which can lay a thick, oily smoke screen by injecting diesel fuel into its exhaust. Lugs for ERA (similar to the Russian Kontakt-3 ERA) were added to turret sides, and lugs on the armoured track skirts and on the glacis. Lugs for a relatively small amount of ERA bricks on the turret front; the ERA on the turret front would only protect 40% of hits to the turret front. On side of the turret, clusters of four smoke grenade launchers; at the rear of the turret another cluster of four smoke grenade launchers, firing backwards instead of forward.
Ch'ŏnma-ho V - Armour upgrades derived partially from the T-90S and T-72S, as well as a better ballistic computer and the addition of the aforementioned thermal imagers. Upgraded main gun - a copy of the 2A46 125 mm gun. Some sources also claim an autoloader was installed, however, this statement is questionable since the Pokpung'ho (another T-62-based tank with the 2A46 125 mm gun) was confirmed to have a manual loader. The fire control system was replaced with one matching the new main gun, and the spent shell ejection system was dispensed with. Used wider tracks.
Ukraine
T-55AGM - Ukrainian T-54/T-55 modernization which can also be applied to T-62s.
T-62AG - Upgraded by Kharkiv Morozov Machine Building Design Bureau. It is fitted with the 5TDF 700 hp diesel engine, a 125 mm KBA-101 tank gun, new fire control equipment and enhanced armour protection. The combat weight is 39.5 tonnes. The crew still consists of 4 men because there is no automatic loader. The upgrade package is aimed at the export market, since the Ukrainian army no longer uses the T-62.
Kharkiv Morozov Machine Building Design Bureau is offering three T-62 conversions:
 - T-62 based heavy infantry fighting vehicle
 - T-62 based armoured recovery vehicle
 - T-62 based armoured bridge layer
United States
T-62 - This version is modified in a number of ways including the replacement of the original diesel engine with a Caterpillar diesel engine and fitting of US radios and antennae mounts. T-62 tanks modified in such a way were used by the US Army for opposing forces training.

Operators

Current operators
 Afghanistan - 100 were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1975 and 1976. 155 were ordered in 1979 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1979 and 1991 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). in service with the Afghan army were T-62, T-62M and T-62M1.
 Algeria - 330 delivered between 1977 and 1979.
 Angola - 175 were ordered in 1980 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1985 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). 35 were ordered in 1987 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1987. 100 were ordered in 1987 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1987 and 1988 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). 24 were ordered in 1993 from Bulgaria and delivered in 1993 (the vehicles were previously in Bulgarian service). 30 were ordered in 1993 from Russia and delivered between 1993 and 1994 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet and then Russian service; some could be T-55s). 18 are currently in service.
 Cuba - 200 were ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1976 and 1983 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). 200 were ordered in 1984 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1984 and 1988. 380 are currently in service. They are modernised to the T-62M standard.
 Egypt - 750 were ordered in 1971 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1972 and 1975. Approximately 600 (500 of which are modernised and 100 stored) are currently in service. 1,300 T-62s were in service in the 1980s. Currently 500 are in service.
 Eritrea - Received a number from Ethiopia.
 Ethiopia - 20 were ordered in 1977 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1977 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). 50 were ordered in 1980 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1980 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). Approximately 100 are currently in service.
Tigray Defense Forces
 Iran - 65 were ordered in 1981 from Libya and received in 1981 as aid (the vehicles were previously in Libyan service). 100 were ordered in 1982 from Syria and delivered in 1982 (the vehicles were previously in Syrian service). Iran ordered 150 Ch'ŏnma-hos in 1981 from North Korea and they were delivered between 1982 and 1985. They had 100 T-62s and Ch'ŏnma-hos in service in 1990, 150 in 1995, 75 in 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2008. Currently 50 are in service.
 Kurdistan Region - 100-120 with PUK Peshmerga forces, and 50 with KDP peshmerga forces.
 Libya - 150 were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1974. 400 were ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1976 and 1978. 250 were ordered in 1978 from the Soviet Union and delivered in 1978. At the peak there were approximately 900 T-62s in service. Before the fall of the Gaddafi regime, 100 were in service and 70 were stored. In 2020, T-62Ms and T-62MVs were delivered by Russia to the Libyan National Army.
 Mongolia - 100 were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1973 and 1975. 250 are in service in 2011.
 North Korea - 350 were ordered in 1970 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1971 and 1975. 150 ordered in 1974 from the Soviet Union were delivered between 1976 and 1978. North Korea also produced more than 1,200 Ch'ŏnma-hos. There were 1,200 Ch'ŏnma-hos in service in 1985, 1,500 in 1990, 1,800 in 1995, 800 in 2000 and 2000 in 2011.
 Russia - At least 2,000 were inherited from the Soviet Union. 761 were in active service in 1995. 191 were in active service and 1,929 in storage as of 2000. During 2013 all the tanks of the model and its modifications were allegedly scrapped - later it was found this was not true, as Russia reactivated numerous T-62s to resupply the Syrian Army. In 2022, Russia sent T-62 tanks to reinforce the Southern Ukraine offensive in Zaporizhzhia Oblast during the 2022 Russian Invasion of Ukraine; reportedly up to 600 T-62s were taken out of long-term storage.
 Syria - 500 were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1973 and 1974. 200 ordered in 1978 from Libya were delivered in 1979 as aid. 300 were ordered in 1982 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1982 and 1984 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service). This country had 1,000 T-62Ms and T-62Ks in service in 1990, 1995, 2000, 2001 and 2003 and around 1,000 in 2005. In 2018, the Russian Federation reactivated and field-tested T-62M and T-62MV tanks from war stores and transported them to Syria.
Syria Free Syrian Army - Limited use of captured government tanks.
People's Defense Units (YPG)
 Tajikistan - 10 were in service in 2000, 7 in service as of 2013.
 Uzbekistan - 179 were in service in 1995, 190 in 2000 and 170 in 2005.
 Vietnam - Around 70.
 Yemen - 150.
Former operators
 Belarus - 170 were in service in 1995; by 2000 they had been taken out of service.
 Bulgaria - 250 were ordered in 1969 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1970 and 1974. A number were received from the Soviet Union after the Soviet-Afghan War, modernised, withdrawn from service, and then converted into TV-62Ms. Withdrawn from service around 2000, only recovery vehicles remain in use.
 Iraq - 100 were ordered in 1973 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1974 and 1975. 600 ordered in 1976 from the Soviet Union were delivered between 1977 and 1979. 2,150 were ordered in 1982 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1982 and 1989 (the vehicles were probably previously in Soviet service). 1,500 were in service in 1990, 500 in 1995, 2000 and 2002. More than 1,000 were in service before the Gulf War.
 Islamic State
 Israel - 120 Tiran-6 (non-combat service).
Forces Libanaises Flag.svg Lebanese Forces - the Christian Lebanese Forces militia received 64 T-55 and T-62 tanks from Iraq via Jordan in 1988-89.
 Soviet Union - More than 20,000 were produced between July 1961 and 1975. There were 12,900 in 1985 and 11,300 in 1990. The tanks were passed on to successor states.
 Turkmenistan - 7.
 Ukraine - At least 300 were inherited from the former Soviet Union. 85 in service in 1995, 1 in 1996, none in 2000.
 North Yemen - 16 ordered in 1979 from the Soviet Union were delivered in 1980 (the vehicles were previously in Soviet service).
 South Yemen - 50 were ordered from the Soviet Union in 1979 and received in 1979 as aid. Another 100 were ordered in 1980 from the Soviet Union and delivered between 1981 and 1982. 120 more ordered in 1986 from the Soviet Union were delivered in 1986. All the vehicles of the last batch were previously in Soviet service.
 Yemeni Southern Rebels - 56 were ordered in 1994 from Bulgaria and delivered in 1994 (the vehicles were previously in Bulgarian service; they were bought for $20 million).
Evaluation-only operators
 China - A Soviet T-62 was captured by the PLA during the 1969 Sino-Soviet border clash along the Ussuri river. It was used for study only.
 Czechoslovakia - Evaluated the tank, but did not accept it.
Combat history
1969: Sino-Soviet border conflict (Soviet Union)
1973: Yom Kippur War (Egypt, Syria)
1961-1991: Iraqi-Kurdish conflict (Iraq, Peshmerga)
1974-1991: Ethiopian Civil War (Ethiopia)
1975-1991: Western Sahara War (Polisario)
1975-2002: Angolan Civil War (Angola)
1977-1978: Ogaden War (Cuba)
1978-1987: Chadian-Libyan conflict (Libya)
1986-1987: Toyota War
1979-1988: Soviet-Afghan War (Soviet Union)
1979-1989: Cambodian-Vietnamese War
1980-1988: Iran-Iraq War (Iran, Iraq)
1982-1983: Lebanese Civil War, Phase III
1988-1993: Georgian Civil War
1991-1992: War in South Ossetia
1992-1993: War in Abkhazia
1990-1991: Gulf War (Iraq)
1992-1997: Civil war in Tajikistan (Tajikistan)
1994: Yemeni Civil War (1994)
1994-1996: First Chechen War (Russia)
1998-2000: Eritrean-Ethiopian War (Eritrea and Ethiopia)
1999-2009: Second Chechen War (Russia)
2001-2021: War in Afghanistan (Afghan government)
2003-2011: Iraq War
2003: Invasion of Iraq (Iraq)
2008: War in South Ossetia (Russia)
2011: Libyan Civil War (Gaddafi Government)
2011-present: Syrian Civil War (Syrian regime forces, ISIL, and rebels)
2014-present: Second Libyan Civil War (Libyan National Army and Government of National Accord)
2015-present: Yemeni Civil War (2015-present) (Hadi-government forces and Houthis)
2020-present: Tigray War (Ethiopian government forces)
2022-present: 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine (Russian forces)

Chonma-ho
Type 69 tank

Tanks of comparable role, performance and era
AMX 30 - French main battle tank
Leopard 1 - German main battle tank
M60 Patton - US main battle tank
Centurion Mk. 6 - British main battle tank
Stridsvagn 103 - Swedish main battle tank

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